Recovering from a Washington, D.C. Wrongful Death Accident

As drivers, we all try to maximize safety when navigating the road. Sometimes, however, there are things we cannot control. Even the most proactive and careful of drivers may experience bad weather, poor road conditions, or reckless drivers—all of which can have devastating consequences.

When a car accident takes place because of the negligence of another person, however, and the accident results in physical injury, significant property damage, or even death, those who are responsible can be held accountable for their negligent behavior.

According to a recent news report, three people were killed after a deadly head-on car accident. Police on the scene reported that a Chevrolet was going more than 100 miles per hour when it plowed into another vehicle heading in the opposite direction. The Chevrolet was speeding east in westbound lanes when it crashed head-on into a Toyota. Both drivers were pronounced dead at the scene, along with an additional passenger of the Chevrolet. Debris from the car accident also disabled a third vehicle, but the driver and its passenger did not need to be transported to the hospital for treatment. The investigation remains ongoing.

Following a fatal car accident in Washington, D.C., you may feel overwhelmed—especially if you have just lost a loved one or a family member. In Washington, D.C., like other jurisdictions across the country, you have the option of filing a wrongful death suit on behalf of your deceased loved one for monetary compensation after a fatal car accident.

Under Washington, D.C. Code, a wrongful death takes place when an injury to a person results in the death of that individual and was caused by neglect or the wrongful act of another person or organization. When a potential plaintiff chooses to bring a wrongful death lawsuit, they are bringing a legal claim to court on behalf of the deceased person to seek a civil remedy for their loss.

In Washington, D.C., the law requires that a personal representative of the deceased must file the wrongful death lawsuit on behalf of any surviving domestic partners or spouses. If a domestic partner or spouse does not exist, other individuals who are considered next of kin are also entitled to file a wrongful death lawsuit, such as parents, siblings, or children of the deceased.

In a Washington, D.C. wrongful death lawsuit, potential plaintiffs could bring claims to recover several types of monetary damages. Examples include medical bills incurred by the deceased before their passing, funeral costs, lost wages or benefits that the deceased would have earned if they had survived until retirement age, and any additional contributions the deceased may have provided to support loved ones. Washington, D.C. does not place a cap on damages available to surviving family members, but damages for emotional suffering or distress are not available.

Do You Need a Washington, D.C. Personal Injury Lawyer?

If someone you love was recently killed in a Washington, D.C. wrongful death accident, contact the attorneys at Lebowitz & Mzhen for assistance. Our lawyers have recovered more than $55 million for our clients and have represented individuals and families in all types of personal injury claims. To schedule a free consultation today, contact us at 800-654-1949.

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